Food Allergy Research Update

FARE’s Fall edition of Food Allergy News contained a research update on four new food allergy studies, two of which received funding from FARE. Excerpts about the findings of each study are below; click the links to read the full text in our e-newsletter.

Awareness May Be Stabilizing Emergency Department Visits

In 2011, researchers reported that food allergies were responsible for a significantly higher number of emergency department (ED) visits than previously thought. That FARE-funded study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, found that food allergies caused 224,000 visits to the ED each year. The prevalence of food allergy continues to rise and one might expect that this growing number of people with food allergy would increase the number of ED visits caused by food allergy. However, a new study conducted by the same research team, also with funding from FARE, suggests that ED visits are not keeping pace with population increases in food allergy. The data suggest that greater awareness and education are having a favorable effect on the number of ED visits caused by food allergy.

Read more on page 4>

Impact of Food Allergy on Inner-City Children with Asthma

Food allergies and asthma often go hand-in-hand, but researchers do not fully understand the relationship between the two diseases. A research team led by Dr. James L. Friedlander (Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School) surveyed 300 elementary school students with asthma who participated in the School Inner City Asthma Study (SICAS) from 2008 to 2011 to learn more about the connections between food allergy and asthma. Read more about the findings of the study, published online by the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice in September 2013.

Read more on page 4 >

Understanding Anaphylaxis

A new study out of Australia examines a large number of cases of anaphylaxis. This analysis also provides information about the many different inflammatory mediators—proteins and other substances released by the cells of the immune system—that play a role in potentially life-threatening reactions.

Read more on page 5 >

Vitamin D and Food Allergy

Babies who are deficient in vitamin D are more likely to have a food allergy, according to a study of over 5,000 one-year-old infants conducted by Australian researchers. The study, published in the April 2013 issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (JACI), provided the first direct evidence that an adequate vitamin D level may protect babies against food allergies.

Read more on page 5 >

The full research update was published in the Fall 2013 issue of FARE’s Food Allergy News. Read more of the newsletter here.

A Letter from Santa to Your Child with Food Allergy

We all know that Santa Claus loves when kids leave him milk and cookies on Christmas Eve. Santa knows all about food allergies though and wants your kids to help him spread some cheer!

You can download and personalize this letter from Santa to help get your kids in the kitchen and involve them in making some allergy-friendly holiday treats, all in an effort to help Santa’s elves.

Download and customize the letter.

santaletter

Food Allergy-Friendly Summer Camps

312451_10150318964367416_1330614613_nWith the school year winding down, kids across the country are counting down the days until summer. For many kids, summer will include attending a camp.

Ensuring a safe (and fun!) camp experience for children with food allergies requires camp staff, physicians, parents, and campers to work together. Our website contains many helpful tips on how to choose a camp and prepare your child. Additionally, our Resources for Camps page can be a great tool to send to camp staff prior to your child’s arrival.

We’re also introducing a new resource – a list of camps that cater to children with food allergies. There are many camps across the country that are either designed specifically for children with food allergies or welcome campers with food allergies. These camps remove certain allergens from their sites, have instituted procedures for anaphylactic emergencies, and have medical personnel on location who are trained in administering epinephrine.

View the food allergy camps list on our website>

Please note that FARE does not certify, review, or accredit camps. Parents should complete a thorough and independent review of a camp’s practices and procedures to ensure their safety and capacity to accommodate a child with food allergies.

The camp list is a work in progress, and we look forward to hearing from members of the community about camps that have been great partners in providing your child a safe and inclusive camp experience.

Do you know of a camp that’s great for kids with food allergies? Tell us about it in the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Please note that FARE does not endorse, promote, or benefit from listing these camps.This information is provided only as a resource to the food allergy community. FARE has not independently confirmed the completeness or accuracy of the information provided herein. FARE does not assume any responsibility for, or warrant, the representations or offers made within this directory. Nor does FARE assume responsibility for the actions of camps or camp staff members.