Food Allergy Research

In Babies Treated for Eczema, Early Introduction to Egg Limits Egg Allergy Prevalence

A clinical trial conducted in Japan and published online in The Lancet (Dec. 8, 2016) found that the development of egg allergy in infants with eczema was dramatically reduced by aggressive eczema treatment combined with regular consumption of heated whole-egg powder. The prevalence of egg allergy was 79 percent lower among one-year-olds who had eaten… Continue reading In Babies Treated for Eczema, Early Introduction to Egg Limits Egg Allergy Prevalence

Food Allergy Research

New Study Identifies Predictors of Biphasic Allergic Reactions

Do you know what to look out for in the hours after an anaphylactic reaction? In some cases after anaphylaxis, there can be a second wave of symptoms that occurs hours or even days later without another exposure to an individual’s food allergen. This is known as a biphasic reaction, and a new study conducted… Continue reading New Study Identifies Predictors of Biphasic Allergic Reactions

Food Allergy Research

Results of New Peanut Allergy Trials Presented at EAACI Meeting

The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) recently held its 2015 Annual Congress in Barcelona, Spain. FARE CEO Dr. James R. Baker, Jr. and FARE SVP of Research and Operations Mary Jane Marchisotto, attended the meeting, where new research findings about food allergies were presented. Of interest to the food allergy community, results… Continue reading Results of New Peanut Allergy Trials Presented at EAACI Meeting

Food Allergy Research

Correcting Misconceptions About the LEAP Study

FARE is committed to ensuring that individuals and families managing food allergies receive accurate, evidence-based information about the disease. Incorrect information can lead to worse outcomes and potentially dangerous errors when it comes to food allergy. Recently, FARE has noted a number of misleading and inaccurate articles, summaries and blog posts about the Learning Early… Continue reading Correcting Misconceptions About the LEAP Study