School Resources

FARE-CDC Collaboration Results in Resources for Schools

cdccoverThe Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) published “Voluntary Guidelines for Managing Food Allergies in Schools and Early Care Education Programs” last fall. The information in these guidelines helps schools to avoid, recognize, and treat allergic reactions while ensuring that students with food allergies are safely included in all school activities. FARE has created several useful resources based on the CDC guidelines to help increase awareness around food allergy management in schools.

We encourage you to review, download and bring the following documents to your child’s school:

Keeping Children with Food Allergies Safe at School

cdcthumb1Every student at risk for anaphylaxis should have an individual written accommodation plan. A child’s accommodation plan (Section 504 or other written plan) has two parts: the accommodations or services needed for the child to be safely included in activities, and the emergency care plan (such as FARE’s Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Emergency Care Plan). Download this one-page handout of important recommendations from the CDC national guidelines.

Recommended Practices for Reducing the Risk of Exposure to Food Allergens and Responding to Food Allergies in Schools and Early Childhood Education Programs

cdcthumb2On pages 41–43 of the CDC guidelines are recommended practices and accommodations to help ensure that children with food allergies are safely included in school. Download this one-page handout of important recommendations from the CDC national guidelines. Recommendations for the Classroom, Cafeteria, Transportation, School Events, and Physical Education and Recess include practices such as:

  • Avoid the use of identified allergens in class projects, parties, holidays and celebrations, arts, crafts, science experiments, cooking, snacks, or rewards;
  • Use non-food incentives for prizes, gifts and awards;
  • Do not exclude children with food allergies from field trips, events, or extra-curricular activities;
  • Encourage hand washing before and after handling or consuming food; and
  • Have rapid access to epinephrine auto-injectors and train staff to use them.

Actions for School Boards and School District Administrators

Data from CDC’s 2006 School Health Policies and Programs Study indicated that only slightly more than 40 percent of school districts have model food allergy policies. District policies are implemented with the support of board members, the district superintendent, and district-level staff members.

cdcthumb3School Boards can adopt written policies that direct and support clear, consistent, and effective practices for managing the risk of food allergies and responding to food allergy emergencies. A comprehensive and uniform set of district policies can promote consistency of priorities, actions, and options for managing food allergies across the district to avoid confusion and haphazard responses, as well as ensuring that practices are aligned with federal and state laws, including regulations, and policies, as well as other established school policies. Download this handout.

cdcthumb4School District Administrators can provide direct assistance to schools to help them meet the needs of students with food allergies, especially when the school does not have key staff, such as a doctor or a full-time registered nurse. Effective management of food allergies in schools requires the participation of many people. Administrators can help ensure that policies and procedures are established in order to identify students with food allergies, and that all school staff understand the school’s responsibilities under the federal laws and regulations that govern food allergies at school including, but not limited to: Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). Download this document.

For additional information, please visit: www.foodallergy.org/cdc

This article was originally published in the Summer 2014 issue of FARE’s Food Allergy News. Read more of the newsletter here.

One thought on “FARE-CDC Collaboration Results in Resources for Schools

  1. As far as handwashing in the 504 plan, is this for all the kids in the class or just the food allergy child? Is there any research on gluten/wheat residue on the hands after eating? Does it need to be washed off and will it endanger my anaphylactic to wheat/gluten child if his classmate has not washed their hands after eating gluten?

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